Auto Accident

Photo courtesy of Nampa Police Department

Take Another Look at the Picture

If you look closely at the picture above, you’ll notice that the young driver of this truck is very lucky to be alive today. They had been speeding in Nampa, a suburb of Boise, Idaho, before they crashed into a fence. The truck was impaled by a metal fence strip.  No doubt-it was luck and pure happenstance that this crash was not fatal–literally, by just inches. The irony of what could have been was not lost on the officers responding to the call.

In fact, local police penned a plea to parents of all young drivers–to have some heart-to-heart conversations about driver responsibility and potential hazards that can happen when driving negligently. There’s nothing worse for police officers than having to notify families of tragic circumstances, especially of children.

The Nampa Police Department says this was definitely a close call and it will hopefully serve as a reminder of how we are all vulnerable on the road.

Dear Parents of Young Drivers–

Please take a few minutes today to sit down with your driving-aged kids and remind them that driving is a huge responsibility. The young drivers in this truck were going too fast and crashed into a fence. They are lucky to be alive. 
Take this opportunity to have a frank conversation and show them these photos. Let them know you care and we care. 
We don’t want to respond to these crashes. 
We don’t want to have to make tragic family notifications. 
And we know, as parents, how you feel about the terrifying possibilities….
The kids in this vehicle only had minor injuries. Everyone is grateful for that! 
It could have been much different. 
Thanks-

Nampa Police Department

http://idahonews.com/news/local/nampa-police-department-dear-parents-of-young-drivers

Parents–Be Aware

Wake-up calls happen to every parent from time to time. There’s nothing more gut-wrenching than finding out your child has been hurt, or even killed, in what could have been a totally preventable crash. Driving is a huge responsibility and comes at the expense of every driver on the road. No amount of training, driver education courses, or hours behind the wheel will prepare a young driver for what they can or cannot do in a motor vehicle if they are being immature and willfully reckless for fun. They need to understand that in real life we are all held accountable for our own behavior. The law and rules of the road define the consequences to risky behavior.

Check out this article for some great insight into a few of the reasons behind teen crashes: http://newsroom.aaa.com/2015/03/distraction-teen-crashes-even-worse-thought/.

The best way to avoid painful consequences–is for the risky driving behavior not to happen in the first place. Parents need to be more aware of what causes teen auto crashes and address those issues personally with their own child. Awareness by addressing these issues will have greater impact on a young driver then any infomercial, teen driver pamphlets, or news article.

Teen Driving Stats

Here’s some information and stats on teen drivers to help you set the stage for that important conversation with your young driver.

Photo courtesy: http://www.rmiia.org/auto/teens/Teen_Driving_Statistics.asp

  1.  33% of deaths among 13 to 19-year-olds in 2010 occurred in motor vehicle crashes
  2.  16-year-olds have higher crash rates than drivers of any other age
  3.  56% of teens said they talk on the phone while driving
  4.  Statistics show that 16 and 17-year-old driver death rates increase with each additional passenger
  5.  Only 44% of teens said they would definitely speak up if someone were driving in a way that scared the
  6.  Teen drivers with involved parents are twice as likely to wear seat belts
  7.  More than 40% of teen auto deaths occur between the hours of 9 p.m. and 6 a.m
  8.  Talking on a cell phone can double the likelihood of an accident as well as slow a young driver’s reaction time down to that of a 70-year-old
  9.  1 in 5 of 16-year-old drivers has an accident within their first year of driving
  10.  56% of teenagers rely on their parents to learn how to drive
  11.  Crash risk for teens increase incrementally with each mile per hour over the speed limit

Bottom Line

“Immaturity and lack of driving experience are the two main factors leading to the high crash rate among teens. Teens’ lack of experience affects their recognition of and response to hazardous situations and results in dangerous practices such as speeding and tailgating.” Research also shows that when teenage drivers have other teens in the car with them, the risks of a car crash dramatically increase. http://www.iii.org/issue-update/teen-drivers

What We Can Do

Parents:

Talk to your kids. Safely driving a vehicle takes skill and attention. Expect safe driving behavior or consequences for the lack of it. Youthful carelessness should never be at the expense of somebody’s life-including their own. Driving entails keeping rules and regulations. Speed limits, curfews, seat belts-these aren’t punishments or things to be ignored in order to have a good time. It keeps our roadways moving and people safe.

Young Drivers:

Listen to your parents. Learn from somebody else’s mistake and be thankful that we all get a lucky break occasionally. Don’t take the chance that you’ll get lucky if you’re driving recklessly though! Remember: safe driving behaviors, obeying the rules of the road, and always wearing a seat belt are NOT luck. They are signs of a mature and responsible driver.

Auto Accident & Personal Injury Lawyers Are Here to Help

If you or a loved one have been injured in a car accident caused by a negligent driver, call Fielding Law Group today for a free consultation with one of our experienced legal professionals.  It’s not just luck–we work hard to get you the compensation and settlement you deserve, so you can move on with your life. Remember–Don’t let an accident wreck YOU!

 

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